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Uncharted: The Lost Legacy Review Roundup


Gamespot:

The Lost Legacy doesn't signify a new era for Uncharted so much as it presents an opportunity to show the series from new perspectives, for which Chloe and the AI-controlled Nadine are perfectly capable. With a new playable treasure hunter comes new settings and character motivations, wrapped in a comfortingly familiar Uncharted package.

Eurogamer:

Many won't mind that and will point, reasonably, to the sheer unflagging quality and effortlessness of this action romp. Others, like me, will take pleasure in finding that a smaller Uncharted doesn't mean a lesser one, and that even in a series known for its excess, less can be more. And Nate? To be honest, I didn't really miss him.

Gameinformer:

Given just how fully featured this adventure is, Lost Legacy could have easily been Uncharted 5. Where Naughty Dog goes next is anyone’s guess, but I would love to see Chloe and Nadine return for another hunt, as they’re every bit as engaging as the Drake family. They make a hell of a team.

Polygon:

I went into Uncharted: The Lost Legacy expecting a light stand-alone adventure, but it turns out to serve a much greater purpose. Despite the new protagonist, this game serves as a celebration of everything the Uncharted series has come to represent over a decade of mostly strong releases from Naughty Dog.

Destructoid:

Uncharted: The Lost Legacy proves that Naughty Dog doesn't need Drake to keep this series going. It's familiar in just about every respect, but given how much refinement has slowly crept up since 2007, it's cemented itself as one of the most reliable action-adventure franchises in recent years.

Kotaku:

For all that I hope Naughty Dog refines their next game, I can’t say I regret taking another scenic spin down Uncharted lane. Lost Legacy tells a winning tale of friendship set against a backdrop of gorgeous mayhem, and it might even teach you a thing or two about Indian history along the way.

Agents of Mayhem Review Roundup


Attack of the Fanboy:

The presentation, the characters, the gameplay -- Agents of Mayhem feels like a great game in spots.  It's got all the Saints Row style that you're accustomed to seeing from Volition, but it lacks in features when compared to other open world games of this nature.

Destructoid:

But despite these technical flaws, I still had a really fun time messing around with the agents. Enjoying Agents of Mayhem is sort of like watching a cartoon you used to love without the rose-colored glasses of nostalgia or the naivete of youth. You'll get more of a kick laughing at it, rather than with, but there's a smile on your face either way.

Gameinformer:

Agents of Mayhem is absurd, but it leans into its own insanity in a charming way and backs it all up with fun, destructive action

Gamespot:

Obnoxious attitude, poor mission design, and technical bugs make Agents of Mayhem chaotic and repetitive.

Kotaku:

Agents of Mayhem is many things, but mostly it's what happens when the development studio responsible for one of the raunchiest game series dials back the dildos and gives its heroes a little more maturity and humanity. It's something special. Like Uranus.

Polygon:

Agents of Mayhem heaps theoretical fun on you. Characters, powers, upgrades, tons of missions — it's desperate to for the player to just have fun. It's a noble impulse, but one that it's depressingly incapable of consistently delivering on.

Matterfall Review Roundup


Gameinformer:

Matterfall’s brand of action is simple but refined, producing many doses of adrenaline as you survive overwhelming odds again and again. The shooting is satisfying, and zipping across stages while blasting foes is a great, dumb time. For those who like their action simple but visually pleasing and challenging, Matterfall is an easy recommendation.

Gamespot:

At first it's great to engage with Housemarque's tried-and-tested designs again, but Matterfall never manages to build off of its promising foundation, and it even mishandles one of the studio's longest-standing mechanics: dashing. There is still some fun to be had, and it's easy to appreciate the technical artistry on display, but factor in inconsistent controls and long load times, and it's easy to grow frustrated throughout the Matterfall's short campaign.

God is a Geek:

Matterfall is a work of art, and a lesson in game design. Not only is it smooth to play, and void of any technical failings, it’s a lot of fun. It’s one of those titles on PlayStation that you can put on and waste a few hours with, getting addicted to its masterfull gameplay, stunning visuals, and wide range of guns, bullets, and strategical options.

Press Start:

Matterfall is the kind of game Housemarque does best – easy to learn, but a little harder to master. Achievement hunters will find themselves speedrunning and shooting through for the high score points, while other players will have loads of fun with the zero-G and Matter mechanics.

Nidhogg 2 Review Roundup


Destructoid:

All that being said, it's easy to suggest Nidhogg 2 on its own merits. It has expanded on the wonderful mechanics of the original and has one of the best soundtracks in recent memory. There isn't much content here for the solo player, but if you've got friends coming over for some friendly competition, the night would not be complete without Nidhogg 2.

Hardcore Gamer:

Outrageous artwork aside, Nidhogg 2 is cut from the same cloth as Nidhogg. It attempts to enhance gameplay by offering more weapons and this was a successful move.

Gameinformer:

Though it doesn’t add much for players looking to play around with its improvements solo, Nidhogg 2 adds layers of depth to a simple formula without breaking what made it so appealing in the first place. The new weapons and maneuvers blend seamlessly into fights, making them more dynamic and tense. Its single-player offerings may be paper-thin, but for anyone looking to test themselves against their friends, Nidhogg 2 is hard to beat.

Gamespot:

Despite its problems, Nidhogg 2 is spectacular, engrossing, funny, tragic, and dramatic in equal measure, and it will no doubt become another party game staple. Nidhogg 2 sacrifices simplicity for more options, and it doesn't prove to be a good trade. But when the underlying action is this good, I'll put up with the odd unwelcome dagger.

Sonic Mania Review Roundup


Destructoid:

Sonic Mania is short but sweet. It even functions as a proper Sonic 4 if you don't count the episodic Sonic 4 (remember that one?). As long as the same team is in charge I can easily deal with one of these every few years or so while Sega tries to strike Sonic Adventure gold again and again with their 3D iterations.

Eurogamer:

1992 is alive and well. Christian Whitehead and team turn in a beautiful rewrite of the 16-bit Sonic games with all-new stages.

Gameinformer:

Sonic Mania succeeds in paying homage to the classic '90s entries that so many fans remember fondly, and in the process delivers the best Sonic game in decades.

Gamespot:

Sonic Mania is both an evolution of the series' iconic formula and the best Sonic game ever made.

Kotaku:

Sonic Mania clearly articulates Sonic's true appeal: Sonic is pure joy, a spinning ball of fun blazing a trail towards the next adventure.

Polygon:

If more of what Sonic is what you want, then this is very much that, but more, and bigger, and faster. But for me, as someone with fond memories but key criticisms, Sonic Mania seems content to paint over some of the series' problems rather than fix them, making for a game that falls a little short of what might have been.

This Month's EDGE Review Scores


  • Splatoon 2 [8]
  • Pyre [8] / PS4
  • Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice [4] / PS4
  • Tacoma [7] / PC
  • Aven Colony [7] / PC
  • The End is Nigh [7]
  • Hey! Pikmin [6]
  • Tiny Trax [6]

Lawbreakers Review Roundup


Destructoid:

Boss Key's philosophy allows for a more old-school arena shooter approach where skill-based twitch reaction is more important than team composition. That's not a knock on any other game, it's just a different feel that Boss Key was going for with LawBreakers, and succeeded. It might not have the flair of a few other games on the market, but it has strong bones that can grow over time.

Hardcore Gamer:

With eight different classes that feel completely unique from each other, and the zero gravity mechanics that can yield firefights the likes of which have not truly been seen before, LawBreakers makes a mark of its own in an increasingly crowded genre. Character action shooters aren’t in short supply right now, but this one absolutely deserves attention. The high skill threshold and the interplay between classes actually makes this the first game I’d be willing to watch in eSports.

Push Square:

LawBreakers’ world and characters don’t carve deep impressions, but the experience itself exerts a strong pull with its diverse, balanced classes, solid selection of modes, and stellar gunplay. It’s more than a nice distraction from its looming competitors, and while the map design and implementation of gravity leave more to be desired, the game has the potential to further defy gravity and our expectations if it keeps shooting for the moon.


It doesn’t have the colorful personality of Overwatch, but give Lawbreakers a chance. Get beyond the steep learning curve and you’ll find a team-based shooter packed with smart ideas and interesting mechanics, where great movement capabilities and a fine mix of weapons keep the action furious and fun. If you’re looking for an online FPS where skill and speed matter, Lawbreakers has what it takes

Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice Review Roundup


Eurogamer:

Ninja Theory crafts a highly competent action game and a nuanced, powerful exploration of mental health.

Destructoid:

Slowly but surely Ninja Theory has moved into film territory, but they can't let go of their need to shove action mechanics into everything they do. With the increased focus and acceptance of so-called "walking simulators" there's a huge market they can tap into, and I hope they end up doing that in the future.

Game informer:

Given the heavy subject matter, calling Hellblade "entertaining" feels inappropriate. However, it is undeniably memorable, telling a compelling tale that explores subject matter many consider taboo

God is a Geek:

One of the most inventive games of the year, showing that time and patience can be behind a challenging, smart, and incredibly interesting game.

Push Square:

Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice is not going to appeal to all tastes, and nor does it try to. As a character action game, it has decent if underdeveloped combat and a mixture of some excellent and some overplayed puzzles. But it's the way that the title utilizes the unique attributes of the medium to raise awareness of mental health that elevates this release beyond the sum of its parts.

This Week's Famitsu Review Scores


  • Boost Beast (Switch) – 7/7/8/8 [30/40]
  • Dragon Quest XI: Echoes of an Elusive Age (PS4) – 10/10/10/10 [40/40]
  • Dragon Quest XI: Echoes of an Elusive Age (3DS) – 10/10/10/10 [40/40]
  • Get Even (PS4) – 9/8/7/8 [32/40]
  • The Lost Child (PS4) – 8/8/8/8 [32/40]
  • The Lost Child (PS Vita) – 8/8/8/8 [32/40]
  • Paradox of Gemini (PS Vita) – 8/7/8/7 [30/40]
  • Taisho Mebiusline: Teito Bibouroku Hare (PS Vita) – 8/7/8/8 [31/40]
  • White Day: A Labyrinth Named School (PS4) – 7/6/6/8 [27/40]
  • Yomawari: Midnight Shadows (PS4) – 8/7/8/8 [31/40]
  • Yomawari: Midnight Shadows (PS Vita) – 8/7/8/8 [31/40]

This Week's Famitsu Review Scores


Crystareino (3DS) – 6/7/7/6 [26/40]

Hitman: The Complete First Season (PS4) – 8/9/9/9 [35/40]

Hitman: The Complete First Season (XBO) – 8/9/9/9 [35/40]

Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 (PS4) – 7/8/7/7 [29/40]

Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 (XBO) – 7/8/7/7 [29/40]

The Snack World: Trejarers (3DS) – 9/9/8/9 [35/40]

Splatoon 2 (Switch) – 9/9/9/10 [37/40]